"Who are you?"

I've no clue who you are, I barely have an inkling of who I am. One thing that I found interesting about the articles is the way that they are defining identity on the internet. If you don't state your race, then your identity is defined as that of a white, middle class man. It makes sense, and it is true, but, it brings once more the question of what identity truly is. I don't know, maybe I'm looking too into this question, but, even in the Warschauer article, it seemed that language, and race were the only factors that defined this particular "identity." Perhaps the other factors that make up identity are of no importance when it comes to the internet, but they should not just be discarded, and seem as less important than what they are.
In one of the RDC articles, there were two members of what I believe to be a MUD, and apparently they were dismissing someone's ability to state on his/her profile his/her race, and blaming this person who stated his/her race as being the one who brought it upon his/herself to be bombarded with insults, I believe, because of his/her race. I found it funny, because they said that being on the internet had no relationship to one knowing any other one's race, and it's interesting because I was reading a book for this other class, and it gave an example of why people don't like discussing race, and it basically said it was because people feel guilty when they acknowledge ethnic differences and so forth. But, is this one of the reasons why these members of that MUD decided to dismiss this issue? Perhaps not, but it just made me think about the whole issue one comes across when one is "neuter" online.

I usually just think of myself, and those I know online, by their alias or s/n or member name or what have you. I simply don't care about race, gender, age, class etc... when I am online. I don't really even understand why people seems to make such a big deal out of race / identity online. The apparent animity of an alias prevents me from ever identifying the other person from anything other than their s/n (unless I know them in the real world). Maybe I have this opinion because I am a white male and these issues are not at the forefront of my day to day life.

Actually, I can relate to you. I feel the same way in reference to the individuals I interact with online. It's definitely not because you're a "white male," I mean, I'm a "latina." I don't care about race, gender, age and all the rest either. Perhaps it deals with how we perceive the online world? How we were reared to looking at race? I've no clue. It's definitely not an issue online, and even in real life, I'd rather care about a person's personality rather than JUST his/her race. Maybe you're right to dismiss this lack of caring because you don't experience these issues in everyday life, but then again, I experience these issues, and they don't make me see, I suppose, that you're only a white male, or whatever the hell it is that your race is. I don't know, it's just, well, for me, you're a human, and therefore that's cool, I don't know it's kinda weird to type this, considering that it might be offensive on so many grounds, yet not really.

"Let's just say I was testing the bounds of reality. I was curious to see what would happen. That's all it was: just curiosity." -Jim Morrison, 1969.

It seems a bit contrary to say you don't care about race, gender, age and only about the other person's personality when those things influence and make up part of their personality. "Race-gender-age" and personality are not mutually exclusive.

However, I also think it is really the type of community interaction that affects the amount of emphasis a person places upon another's race/age/gender. Depending on how close/interactive a relationship you want to build with person x, that's how important those features or even any features of their identity would be. So maybe in terms of your online interactions, you don't care. But for those people in MUD's and chat rooms from the articles in our reading, in trying to create a fantastical world in cyberspace, these features that influence identity and perceptions of identity are vital.

Once I start rambling I confuse people with my vagueness. I'm sorry. What I meant was that I don't particularly express much caring JUST on a specific factor like gender, race, etc... In personality lies every single thing I mentioned that I cared not for, which of course as you stated contradicts itself, but, I meant singularly speaking, either singular factor does not portray much importance, as the WHOLE character of a person which is made up of many factors. If this is vague, please do question. I'm a very vague person, which is why I tend not to interact much in messaging, and which is why my poetry isn't liked by many.

As far as I have encountered "race-gender-age" I can see where you see that they aren't mutually exclusive, but there are cases when they are singled out, and not seen as a combination of many if not only two factors in personality and so forth.

"Let's just say I was testing the bounds of reality. I was curious to see what would happen. That's all it was: just curiosity." -Jim Morrison, 1969.

"In personality lies every single thing I mentioned that I cared not for, which of course as you stated contradicts itself, but, I meant singularly speaking, either singular factor does not portray much importance, as the WHOLE character of a person which is made up of many factors."

Remember in the second Matrix when Neo talks to the Architect and the Architect goes on to explain the matrix, I think that is what you just did. Or the hilarious will Ferrell impersonation. (The will ferrell part is 6 minutes into the video)

I think you were trying to say something along the lines of personality matters, and everything that goes into it, but all you see on the internet is the personality itself, and not those contributing factors.

Hmm... Is this supposed to be a compliment??? Ha, it doesn't matter, the fact is that I find it funny either way...

YES!!! That is what I was trying to say, but it somehow got lost in the long explanation and the excessive wording.

"Let's just say I was testing the bounds of reality. I was curious to see what would happen. That's all it was: just curiosity." -Jim Morrison, 1969.